Tag Archives: geology

Where Does One Ocean End And Another Begin?

Where Does One Ocean End And Another Begin?

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Earth’s ocean water is continuous. How can we divide it into sections that are more useful?

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To learn more, start your googling with these keywords:
IHO: International Hydrographic Organization
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We had fun playing with (and transitioning between) different map projections in this video, and we came across this great – and mesmerizing! – website:
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Writer, Director, and Narrator: Kate Yoshida (@KateYoshida)
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References:

Antonello, A. (2018). The Southern Ocean. In Armitage D. (Ed.), Oceanic Histories (296-318). Cambridge University Press.

Candido, M. (2011). South Atlantic. In Burnard, T. (Ed.), Oxford Bibliographies Online: Atlantic History, Oxford University Press.

Caspers, H. (1965). Van Mieghem, J. and Van Oye, P (Eds), Biogeography and Ecology in Antarctica. The Hague: Dr. W. Junk Publishers.

Lewis, M.W. (1999). “Dividing the Ocean Sea.” Geographical Review 89 (2), 188-214.

International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), (1953): Limits of Oceans and Seas, International Hydrographic Organization., Bremerhaven.

International Hydrographic Organization (IHO), (2002): Limits of Oceans and Seas , International Hydrographic Organization (DRAFT), Monaco.

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What If the Yellowstone Volcano Erupted Tomorrow?

What If the Yellowstone Volcano Erupted Tomorrow?

Located in the United States, one of the world’s largest volcanoes is gearing up to explode. It’s known as the Yellowstone Volcano, and it’s not just any regular volcano. Instead, it’s a supervolcano! If Yellowstone decided to erupt, the results would be devastating. But just how bad would they be? Is there anything we could do to stop it? Could this affect the entire world? And how would this change our weather?

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15 New Stunning Images Of Mars From Curiosity Rover (2020)

15 New Stunning Images Of Mars From Curiosity Rover (2020)

15 New Stunning Images Of Mars From Curiosity Rover (2020)

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From the various peaks of mountains, to the valleys that help reveal so much about red planet, join me as we explore brand new images from Mars via the Curiosity Rover.
I want you to imagine that you are on Mars right now. That is after all the goal of many in the world right now. Between NASA, Space X, and various other international agencies, there are a lot of people who are working hard to get us to the red planet known as Mars, and in the process, create history. Because when we do land on Mars, it’ll be the first time a human has stepped foot on another planet.

15. The Curiosity Rover
You might not realize just how much we owe to the Curiosity Rover, so allow me to explain it to you and show you just how much work this singular machine had done. The Curiosity Rover was launched from Earth on November 26th, 2011.

14. Mount Sharp 1:17
In terms of the location of where the Curiosity Rover was posted, that would be the Gale Crater. This was an impact site that at one time was believed to have been a key place for various things like water and sediment. We know that there is water on Mars, and Curiosity has even found various forms of clay via its explorations.
13. 3D Map Of Mars
While not solely a thing from the Curiosity Rover, anytime you can make a top-down 3D map of an area, it can be very helpful in various tasks that you are trying to achieve. And sure enough, with the help of the Curiosity Rover and the satellites above and beyond Mars over the years, NASA was able to make a 3D map of the area the rover is in, and thus, create a way for them to look over the terrain that would help them go and find a path through the crater and up to the peaks of Mount Sharp.

12. Yellowknife Bay
Yellowknife By was one of the areas that the Curiosity Rover had to go through to get to Mount Sharp, and as you can see from these pictures, various styles and compositions of rock are here in this area. By looking at these pictures, a lot of information was able to be determined. Including the fact that at one time, this area was indeed filled with water. Hence the name “Yellowknife Bay”.

11. Parhump Hills
Continuing on its journey to Mount Sharp, the Curiosity Rover found itself looking at the base of the mountain via the Parhump Hills. And with this came a look at places like the Kimberly Foundation. The more pictures that were taken, the more proof was stacked about how the crater was at one time a major place of water.

10. Garden City
Heading now to a rather odd spot on the rovers journey to Mount Sharp was the place known as Garden City. When you take a look at these photos, it’s almost as if the place is full of bones and litter. But in fact, it’s a place that is full of various mineral deposits that winds and weaves throughout the area.

9. Martian Sunset
If you’re hoping to see more aesthetic things that rocks and dirt via the rovers time on Mars, then you’re in luck. Because during its time on the red planet, it had time to get some absolutely beautiful shots of the Martian sunrise and sunset. Do you notice anything interesting in this picture? Exactly. The Martian setting sun has a more bluish tint than anything we have here on Earth.

3. Vera Rubin Ridge
The highest point in its journey thus far, Vera Rubin Ridge is another case of massive erosion and embedding of sediments. Though it’s impossible to tell at present just how each structure was formed, we do know that some were because of wind erosion, but others don’t seem to be that way based on looks alone. Showing that even Mars can have some weird and unknown structures.
2. The View Of Mars
At the top of the ridge, Curiosity took the opportunity to make a beautiful panoramic shot. Showing Mars from the height it was at, and showcasing the depth of field and the distance it had traveled so far. The fun is quite spectacular, and it makes you wonder what it will be like when Curiosity reaches the top of Mount Sharp. It hasn’t reached there yet, but it will soon more than likely.
1. A Hi-Res Panorama
We’ve shown you a lot of pictures over the course of this video, but now, let’s show you a literal brand new one that has come from the Curiosity Rover just days before this video was made. This was a panorama image that was made by the Curiosity Rover taken over the course of a “break” from late November to early December. This Panoramic image is comprised of 1000 photos and is 1.8 BILLION pixels.
The picture itself is of the Glen Torridon, a region on the flanks of Mars’ 3.4-mile-high (5.5 kilometers) Mount Sharp that the rover has been exploring recently.

#InsaneCuriosity #RecentSpaceDiscoveries #MarsEverythingAboutTheRedplanet

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