Tag Archives: earth

What It Would Take to Build A Mars Base!

What It Would Take to Build A Mars Base!

From getting there, to setting up a base that is functional, to slowly getting the place up to detect for a larger colony, and more! Join me as we explore what it would take to set up a base on Mars!

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For many decades now, humanity has dreamed about on another world. Whether it was a distant world in another galaxy, or just making colonies on all the worlds and moons that made sense, we’ve gone and envisioned all kinds of futures for our race. And on a base level, doing so is kind of vital. The Earth is growing more and more populated, but our resources are slowly but surely going to wear out. So, we need to start setting up places outside of Earth for us to inhabit.
The two best options at present are the moon and the planet Mars. And believe it or not, both the moon and Mars have plans in place to not just put people back on its surface, but, to potentially set up very large and functional bases for us (that’s humanity) to live on. But doing so is no small feat. While there have been many missions to the moon, they’ve only been for historical and research purposes. And even with it being MUCH closer to the Earth than Mars, setting up a colony there is not going to be easy. Yet, if you were to ask NASA, SpaceX and a whole bunch of other agencies what the main goal is for the 2020’s, you would get “We’re going to get people to Mars to start building a colony.”
A noble goal, but one that is going to be fraught with problems and will not be easy to get off the ground. But just so we can prove this to you, let’s break down everything you would need in order to make just a basic base on Mars.
First and foremost, you don’t just send people to Mars and hope that they are going to make it, that would be catastrophic on all counts. Which, thankfully, the appropriate space agencies aren’t aiming to do. Whether you look at NASA or Space X you’ll see that there is a “setup mission” that will happen before the first batch of colonists even arrive.
The point of this setup mission is simple, it’s going to dump a wide variety of items for the group to use when they arrive. Think of it like airmailing a package to a vacation spot you’re going to be going to. In this case though, that “package” will likely be a small base where the group will live for the first 9 months (more on that later), a large series of supplies, potential vehicles, generators, and more.
You might wonder why they’re going to outfit all of this stuff on a setup mission versus just putting it on the craft that has the group themselves. The reason is time, money, and weight. The more stuff you have to put on a craft, the more risk you’re taking that something is going to go wrong. Not to mention endanger the lives of the crew, as well as slow down the craft.
Even with some of the best minds working on it, a journey to Mars is going to be SLOW. Thus, launching a setup mission to get the equipment there is a good first move because A) it shows we really can get to the red planet with a ship (which we’ve never done before). B) it shows that landing these very large items on the surface without serious damage is NOT impossible. And C) should the worst happen, we’re only losing inanimate objects and not human lives. Because the moment that happens, a lot of delays are going to happen, and the colonization of Mars will be likely delayed infinitely until people are sure that they can get to Mars safely
So all told, the setup mission is the first and most important thing…in a long chain of important things that needs to happen on Mars for a base to be setup.
Before we dive even more into the base on Mars scenario, be sure to like or dislike the video so we can continue to improve so we can make the best videos possible for you the viewer! Also, subscribe to the channel so that you don’t miss ANY of our weekly videos.
Alright, so let’s assume that we are able to do the setup mission, and the first group of settlers/researchers are able to successfully be on the planet, ok? What would be one of their immediate challenges?
One of the obvious ones is a notion of continual power. After all, to run a base, and especially a large colony, you need power. Now, the setup mission will be delivering a wide variety of generators no doubt. But that’s only a partial solution. You need a long-term one.
The notion of Solar Power has been floated around by many, and it could work. But, it’s problematic. Mars is known for having storms that’ll block out the sun for days on end. Plus, due to distance, the solar power we’d get is only 40% of the kind we’d get on Earth. That could still help, but it won’t solve everything. Likewise, wind and geothermal power…is a no go.
So what can we do? Well…there is the nuclear option. No, not a b*mb, but nuclear power.

#InsaneCuriosity #ColonizingMars #MarsEverythingAboutTheRedPlanet

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What If the Yellowstone Volcano Erupted Tomorrow?

What If the Yellowstone Volcano Erupted Tomorrow?

Located in the United States, one of the world’s largest volcanoes is gearing up to explode. It’s known as the Yellowstone Volcano, and it’s not just any regular volcano. Instead, it’s a supervolcano! If Yellowstone decided to erupt, the results would be devastating. But just how bad would they be? Is there anything we could do to stop it? Could this affect the entire world? And how would this change our weather?

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The Sun Facts And History!

The Sun Facts And History!

From the kind of star it is, to its impact on our world, and more! Join me as we explore the Sun: Facts and History.
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8. Our Star
Without a doubt, if you were to list the “most important things in the solar system we live in”, the Earth may be No.1, but the sun is No.2. And for all the reasons that you might expect and know.
Its gravity holds the solar system together, keeping everything from the biggest planets to the smallest particles of debris in its orbit. Electric currents in the Sun generate a magnetic field that is carried out through the solar system by the solar wind—a stream of electrically charged gas blowing outward from the Sun in all directions.
The connection and interactions between the Sun and Earth drive the seasons, ocean currents, weather, climate, radiation belts and aurora.
In short, and in long, the sun is vital to just about everything we do on this planet, and we rely on the sun to do MANY things, even though we’re honestly not controlling anything that it does. Which is a bit of an odd thing for humanity as humans like to control EVERYTHING that has to do with us.
The sun is something we see almost every day (obviously unless cloud cover is blocking it or an eclipse is happening) and even when we don’t see it, we feel its presence. It’s more than just a ball of light in the sky, it’s an energy source, a lifeline in many respects, and as noted above, it helps shape our planet in various ways that would detrimental if it WASN’T doing it.
So if someone was to honestly ask you just how important the sun is, you should tell them all the ways we need the sun, our star, to shine on.
7. Distance From Earth and Its Size
With a radius of 432,168.6 miles (695,508 kilometers), our Sun is not an especially large star—many are several times bigger—but it is still far more massive than our home planet: 332,946 Earths match the mass of the Sun. The Sun’s volume would need 1.3 million Earths to fill it.
Which at first might seem like a bad thing. After all, would we WANT to have a giant ball of fire and radiation just lurking out there that can swallow us whole if it felt like it? Honestly, yes, yes we would, and for a very simple reason, its distance from the Earth.
The Sun is 93 million miles (150 million kilometers) from Earth. Which is a very LONG ways away, and in fact it’s such a distance that they came up with a term for it via “Astronomical Unit”. So when you hear that a planet or star is say 103 AUs away, that means it’s 103 times the distance between the Earth and the sun.
Going back to the distance itself, you might think that this is a “very long way away” from the entity that gives us light and essentially, life. But actually, it’s better that we’re NOT closer to the sun for a whole host of reasons.
Sunlight and its energy dissipates the farther you get away from it. Which is why there is such thing as a “Habitable Zone” in regards to stars where life can exist as well as water and other key things needed for life.
The closer you are to a star, the more impact you’re going to get from its heat and light. The farther you are from a star, the less likely you’re going to get heat and light in the amounts you need. Lest you think we’re exaggerating this, we have the perfect examples for this. It’s called Mercury, Venus and Mars.
Mercury is the closest planet to the sun, and it’s scorching hot as a result. It’s average temperature is 800 degrees Fahrenheit. Plus, because it’s so close to the sun it’s tidally locked, meaning that it has one “side” always facing the sun, and the other side is always away from it.
In regards to Venus, it’s our “twin” but also a case of the suns energy turning it into something else entirely. A buildup of heat and excess carbon dioxide turned it into a “Runaway Greenhouse Planet” which makes it so hot that it can melt lead. And it’s also the hottest planet in the solar system because of the greenhouse effect which was caused by the suns’ radiation.
Heading to Mars, it’s so far away from the Sun that it can’t absorb the sunlight and energy like we do on Earth, so its average temperature is -81 degrees Fahrenheit. Not to mention it doesn’t have a typical atmosphere in any sense so various solar and cosmic rays bombard the planet. And it’s so far away from the sun that even if Earth settled on the planet, using solar panels to get energy for colonies wouldn’t be as viable as you think because the distance is so great.
So as you can see, it’s GOOD that we are 93 million miles away from the sun, it’s the literal perfect spot to be in to get the positive effects of the sun without many of the negatives.

#InsaneCuriosity #TheSun #TheSolarSystem

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Kuiper Belt: Facts And History!

Kuiper Belt: Facts And History!

From what the belt is, to how it’s helped change the classification of the solar system, and more! Join me as I reveal to you the facts and history of the Kuiper Belt!
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9. What Is The Kuiper Belt?
Despite it being a major part of our solar system, there are many who honestly don’t understand the grand scale and scope of the Kuiper Belt. So allow us to give you some perspective on the matter.
The Kuiper Belt is a circumstellar disc in the outer Solar System, extending from the orbit of Neptune (at 30 AU) to approximately 50 AU from the Sun. It is similar to the asteroid belt, but is far larger—20 times as wide and 20 to 200 times as massive.
Like the asteroid belt, it consists mainly of small bodies or remnants from when the Solar System formed. While many asteroids are composed primarily of rock and metal, most Kuiper belt objects are composed largely of frozen volatiles (termed “ices”), such as methane, ammonia and water.
The Kuiper belt is home to three officially recognized dwarf planets: Pluto, Haumea and Makemake. Some of the Solar System’s moons, such as Neptune’s Triton and Saturn’s Phoebe, may have originated in the region.
In many respects, the Kuiper Belt is the “end” of our solar system in terms of things like the physical objects that are there and reachable. The “edge” of the solar system is a slightly different matter as that would either be the Heliosphere (if you go by magnetic fields) or the Oort Cloud, which is where the suns’ gravity reaches the end of its influence.
But either way, the Kuiper Belt is a major part of our solar system in the literal and figurative sense. Which is rather interesting when you think about it because for a very long time we didn’t understand what was truly in that realm of space as a whole.
8. The Discovery Of The Kuiper Belt
To truly understand the Kuiper Belt, we have to dive into something you’re very familiar with, Pluto.
After the discovery of Pluto in 1930, many speculated that it might not be alone. The region now called the Kuiper belt was hypothesized in various forms for decades. It was only in 1992 that the first direct evidence for its existence was found. The number and variety of prior speculations on the nature of the Kuiper belt have led to continued uncertainty as to who deserves credit for first proposing it.
But let’s go back to the beginning and just break it down from there, shall we?
The first astronomer to suggest the existence of a trans-Neptunian population was Frederick C. Leonard. Soon after Pluto’s discovery by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930, Leonard pondered whether it was “not likely that in Pluto there has come to light the first of a series of ultra-Neptunian bodies, the remaining members of which still await discovery but which are destined eventually to be detected”.
That same year, astronomer Armin O. Leuschner suggested that Pluto “may be one of many long-period planetary objects yet to be discovered.”
This is fascinating for all sorts of reasons, not the least of which is that the discovery of Pluto should have been a finite discovery, or one that led to more study of the planet and what it could mean as a whole. Yet many scientists looked upon it and wondered if it was telling us everything we needed to know about the region.
In 1943, in the Journal of the British Astronomical Association, Kenneth Edgeworth hypothesized that, in the region beyond Neptune, the material within the primordial solar nebula was too widely spaced to condense into planets, and so rather condensed into a myriad of smaller bodies.
From this he concluded that “the outer region of the solar system, beyond the orbits of the planets, is occupied by a very large number of comparatively small bodies” and that, from time to time, one of their number “wanders from its own sphere and appears as an occasional visitor to the inner solar system”, becoming a comet.
That’s not a bad way to describe what the Kuiper Belt really is, and he was right that by modern classifications, the various items in the belt weren’t able to go and become fully-fledged planets. But more on that in a bit.
Before we continue to break down everything that’s going on with the Kuiper Belt, be sure to like or dislike the video, that way we can continue to improve our content for you, the viewer! Also be sure to subscribe so that you don’t miss ANY of our weekly videos!
7. Continued Theories
The more that astronomers wondered about the Kuiper Belt, the more that speculations rose and fell about what it is, what it could be, what it could’ve been, and more.

#InsaneCuriosity #KuiperBelt #TheSolarSystem

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What If Every Satellite Fell to Earth?

What If Every Satellite Fell to Earth?

Thousands of satellites and pieces of debris currently orbit our Earth. They provide us with television, internet, and communications. But what if all these satellites suddenly went offline? And then came crashing down to Earth? What would a crashing satellite do to the Earth? How many satellites would come falling down?

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What If is a mini-documentary web series that takes you on an epic journey through hypothetical worlds and possibilities. Join us on an imaginary adventure through time, space and chance while we (hopefully) boil down complex subjects in a fun and entertaining way.

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MinuteEarth Explains: Human Evolution

MinuteEarth Explains: Human Evolution

Give Blinkist a try!

In this collection of classic MinuteEarth videos, we answer the question “why are you the way that you are?” And check out the Tree of Life Explorer!

0:00 – Intro

0:10 – Which Fish Did We Evolve From?

1:31 – Are We Really 99% Chimp?

4:26 – Why Are Snakes So Creepy?

6:12 – How Long Can We Live?

8:58 – Outro

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